Drive me crazy, part 2: theory test

Remember I wanted to get my driving licence? Well, here’s what happened when I took my theory test!

I took my test at the end of June and foolishly assumed that I’d be able to apply common sense and pass in this way. Nope! There are 100 questions out of a question bank of around 1250, and while some of them are common sense, other require memorising the regulations (some of which are nonsensical) and the chinglish phrases included in it. You can choose to take the test in Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, French or German (and maybe others?). In some ways taking it in Chinese would be easier but they weren’t keen to offer this to me (foreigners don’t speak Chinese after all).

I arrived at the test centre with half an icecream spilled down my front, not a great sign. I had a bit of time to spare so I read through some of the regulations, sending the more amusing ones to friends.

Finally I went upstairs to the testing room, which is in building 1, in the room above the room where you make the appointments (desks 40/41). A man took my papers and checked things through again, before telling me to sit. A few minutes later, he called my name and I sat down at a computer.

I logged in and was a bit weirded out by the video of me in the top corner of the screen. Some of the questions made sense but some of them were nonsense, and some of them I just had no idea what the answer could be. I worked my way through all 100 questions and hit submit… 79. Fail. You get another go straight away and this time I got 78, so I had to go back to the 1st floor to get a number for appointment desks on the 2nd floor, where I made an appointment to retake the test.

Take 2, a few weeks later, and this time I’d studied. I downloaded the app, though couldn’t access more than 150 questions as it wouldn’t let me pay for the premium version. I memorised everything I could and then took a page of notes on some of the bits of the regulations that I knew didn’t make sense or otherwise needed memorisation – penalties for particular traffic offences, etc. I ate another ice cream on the way there, this time not spilling any on me.

I went back to the test room, and when my name was called, sat down at the computer and worked through the questions. If I knew the answer, I answered it; if I didn’t, I left it and came back to it at the end. There were about 15 questions in total that were either too vague/badly written to know what they were asking or I just didn’t know the answer. I made some guesses and hit submit.

An agonising few seconds later, my score popped up on screen. 92! Pass!

I went back to reception and they printed out a page with my passing score. Hilariously this had screenshots of me mid-exam.WeChat Image_20180801111302

I took all these papers down to the 1st floor to get another number for desks 40/41… There I submitted all the papers and was directed to desk 30/31, to pay. I stupidly didn’t keep the receipt but I think it was 70 RMB. I went back to desks over near 40/41 and waited until someone shouted my name (in Chinese), and they handed me my brand new Chinese driving licence!WeChat Image_20180801111231

Watch out, everyone on Chinese roads! Mwahaha.

Costs:

Translation: 50 RMB

Photos: 25 RMB

Medical check: 60 RMB

Theory test: 60 RMB

Licence: 10 RMB

TOTAL COST: 205 RMB

Drive me crazy: getting a driving licence in Shanghai

I started learning to drive when I was 18, just before I moved to London, and after a little break I passed my test when I was 19, driving around the North Circular and pointing out Pat Sharp’s house to my examiner. Amazingly, I passed first time. Then I didn’t drive for many years, because London.

Now I live in another enormous metropolis, one with an even better public transport system, so I thought why not get a driving licence here too? I have no plans to drive, but I thought it would be a useful thing to have.

As I already have a British driving licence, I can apply for a conversion to a Chinese one, rather than having to “learn to drive” from scratch in China. A friend sent me a super useful link, with step by step instructions on what to do. I basically just followed that!

Here’s my experience of applying for my licence!

Firstly, you have to be resident in China with a visa valid for at least 90 days. No problem for me, I have a residence permit currently valid until January 2019.

Secondly, make sure you have a copy of your temporary residence permit (the bit of paper from the police when you move house). I was a bit worried that I didn’t re-register when I came back from Taiwan, but it was fine. If in doubt just go and get another form, it only takes a minute.

Thirdly, get your driving licence officially translated. I went to the Shanghai Interpreters Association on Beijing West Road (上海市外事翻译工作者协会,北京西路1277号(国旅大厦)1607室). It cost 50 RMB, and I first had to write down my Chinese name on a piece of paper (they liked my handwriting), so I don’t know what you’d do if you didn’t have a Chinese name. Or couldn’t write it. They translated my driving licence both with “Miss” as part of my actual name and without.

Yesterday I made photocopies of all the important documents, namely:

  • passport
  • residence permit/visa (in passport)
  • temporary residence permit
  • driving licence (front and back)
  • translation of driving licence

Then today, armed with all those photocopies, and my real life passport, driving licence and certified translation, I went to the Shanghai Vehicle Management Bureau. This is on Hami Road, out by Shanghai Zoo (哈密路1330号).

  • Note to anyone else going! It’s not the place where you get your residence permit health check although it is on the same road! Don’t be like me and go to the wrong place! It’s fairly obvious when you’re in the right place because there are a million cars.

Top tip! Take a plastic wallet to keep your papers/passport/licence in as you have to keep whipping them out and you don’t want to have to keep getting them out of your bag. Or lose anything, heaven forbid.

At the Shanghai Vehicle Management Bureau

Walk in the front gate, try not to get run over.

First up is Building 10. Go to the counter and hand over passport and translated driving licence, then 25 RMB. Then go to the small door by the entrance, where there’s a little photo studio. Give the receipt and your passport to the photographer. I was made to take off my earrings and put on a (giant, grubby) jacket as I was wearing a camisole. As a result I have the exact same look on my face that my brother has in his Year 1 school photo.

Next go to Building 9 to pick up the photos, when they’re ready they’ll be on the counter (it took about a minute). Take three forms from the counter by the door, and if you can write in Chinese then fill it in – if not then I guess get someone to help you. The chap handing out the forms cut out one of the photos for me and stuck it onto one form, then told me which bits to fill in. Keep the rest of the photos safe. Once your forms are filled in, go to the counter and pay 60 RMB.

Next go out of the door and turn left, looking for the sign saying “medical check”. Go in this door and up the stairs. Turn right and then go into each of the rooms to do the medical checks. Give the doctors your papers when you go in and they’ll point you towards whatever apparatus they want you to use. Medical checks today: height, weight, hand strength, squats, basic eyesight, hearing, blood pressure, ECG, colour blindness. Once you’ve been into every room, go to the counter at the end and they’ll make up a certificate. I had a little chat with these guys as they were the friendliest people of the day – they were intrigued as to whether Ireland is a real country and also wanted to know about my Chinese name.

Finally, go to Building 1. Go to the first desk you see and they may send you around the corner to another lady, they did for me but it has the vibe of being a free-for-all. Show this lady your paperwork and she’ll give you a ticket for the queue. Go upstairs (the stairs are to the left) and walk through to the final room. When your number gets called, they’ll go through allllllll the paperwork (and freak out at my driving licence and passport being issued in different countries) and take the photocopies you helpfully provided. Finally, everything gets stapled together and you get asked to choose when you want to take your test. It was booked up for the next 3 weeks but I got a date at the end of the month that works for me. And with that, the appointment slip and all my paperwork was handed back to me and see ya!

What’s this date for? For a theory test. Everything I know is from the link I posted above – it’s a computerised test. I have literally no clue what’s in the test but I guess I have a few weeks to find out.

Tune in later this month to find out if I pass!